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problems. dr. jon lapook examine it is study and what it means. mandy clark one on one with the top u.s. commander in afghanistan on the future of the war and the decision to begin pulling out. the man accused of the worst war crimes in europe since the natsys shows nothing but contempt for justice. mark phillips has the pictures from the court. and on this fourth of july as the space shuttle program nears an end, jim axelrod asks "what happened to the flags on the moon?" >> it's beautiful. >> pelley: do those star spangled banners yet wave? captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening, chantix is the most popular anti-smoking drug on the market with annual sales of nearly $800 million. but a study out today raises new safety questions about it. chantix has already been linked to an increased risk of suicidal thoughts and now to a higher risk of heart disease we asked dr. jon lapook to tell us what we need to know about these new findings. >> reporter: today's study is worrisome news for the more than seven million americans who
to an increased risk of suicidal thoughts and now to a higher risk of heart disease we asked dr. jon lapook to tell us what we need to know about these new findings. >> reporter: today's study is worrisome news for the more than seven million americans who have taken chantix. a new analysis links the pill to a 72% increase in the risk of heart problems. johns hopkins dr. sonal singh led the research. >> it is causing the same problems we are trying to prevent, that's why it's not worth the risk. we need to prevent cardiac disease among smokers, not increase it. >> reporter: the review involves more than 8,000 patients. while a 72% increased risk sounds alarming, a companion editorial entitled "is it a heart breaker?" notice that heart problems are still rare, occurring in only about 1% of patients taking chantix. the drug maker pfizer questions the way the analysis was conducted. dr. gail walk well is vice president of medical affairs for pfizer. >> we will continue to do a more in-depth look as the f.d.a. is asking us to do. to date we have not seen evidence of important risks to the heart
woman. what is next in store for her? jon lieberman the host of "true facts" radio show and one of america's most wanted correspondents, i know you've been busy this week, good morning, john, where does she go from here? >> from my time of america's most wanted covering fugitives, i know she has to act almost like a fugitive the next few weeks and she has to try to blend in. she may try to change her appearance. and see also has to limit her electronic footprint. don't forget about that, too, has to limit any e-mail communication, facebook communication for her own safety. in a lot of ways she has to act like a fugitive. doesn't want to bring attention to herself. >> ainsley: some people are saying she does though. people say she has loved the cameras all along. >> she absolutely has and i think that she's loved the camera, she's loved the attention, but for her own safety, i'm sure she's being advised lay low for a couple of weeks, get some things together. get your life sorted together, maybe start going to treatment. her attorney indicated had a she would start going to treat
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)